Teasing Thursday for Freebies Friday

This post about freebies usually appears on Fridays. In honor of a great week by all who have contacted Good Genes Genealogy Services, here’s your day-before treat:

Like the Ghanianhttps://www.uncommongoods.com/product/sankofa-wall-art Sankofa bird, Good Genes Genealogy Services is looking back to gather research from former and current workshops to help all move forward with their family ancestry research.

Good Genes Genealogy Services Reference Guide

During January and February 2022, the Good Genes Genealogy Services team provided five (5) workshops. The free workshops for the DeKalb County Public Library, and the Saturdays-in-February workshops where the proceeds are fully donated to our host, Hillside International Truth Center, certain references were named.

The following is a compilation of the referenced genealogy materials:

Census

Release of the 1950 U.S. Census records, April 1, 2022. 1950 Census on Track for 2022 Release, Despite Pandemic | National Archives

Free or Limited Trial Genealogy Sites (a sampling)

This site is dedicated to genealogy research for African Americans. https://afrigeneas.com

According to its website, “Ancestry.com LLC is an American genealogy company based in Lehi, Utah. The largest for-profit genealogy company in the world, it operates a network of genealogical, historical records, and related genetic genealogy websites.” https://ancestry.com

African American Genealogical Research How to Begin – African American Genealogical Research – Research Guides at Library of Congress (loc.gov)

Part of the Library of Congress website, Chronicling America has searchable images of US newspapers from 1792-1963. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov

It is based in the UK and already has released the 1921 Census. The site is a compilation of media and government reports. There is a 14-day free trial. https://www.findmypast.com/

Search over 10 billion global historical records, birth, marriage and death records from 32 countries, 25 million pages of historical newspapers dating back to 1803, and more than 6.3 billion names – all with a 14-day free trial. Use it free for two weeks and cancel if it’s not for you. https://www.myheritage.com.

The USGenWeb Project is comprised of volunteers who provide free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county and every state of the United States. It is a non-commercial site and wants to provide free genealogy access for everyone. http://www.usgenweb.org/

Access free digitized images of newspapers, books, films, maps, personal narratives, photos, prints, and drawings.https://www.archives.gov/

This site is free, yet it does ask if you wish to make a donation to keep its access free. Here’s the website announcement “Trace your roots for FREE with our searchable database containing thousands of identified and mystery photos for genealogy enthusiasts looking for long-lost family. Anyone who finds a photo of a direct ancestor that is owned by the archive will receive the photo for free. If the historic photos you find pique your interest in genealogy, you can continue your research by doing a family search here.” https://deadfred.com/

If your ancestors were Jewish, this website has more than 20 million records from all over the world to help you trace your Jewish heritage. https://www.jewishgen.org/

Access free digitized images of newspapers, books, films, maps, personal narratives, photos, prints, and drawings. Home | Library of Congress (loc.gov)

This is an activist group of historians, genealogists, researchers, and open government advocates, Reclaim the Records identifies information that should be in the public domain but has been restricted by the government, archive or library that holds it.  https://www.reclaimtherecords.org

Genealogy Conferences

This site bills itself as “ConferenceKeeper.org is the most complete calendar of genealogy events — anywhere!  Here you will find hundreds to thousands of genealogy webinars, workshops, seminars, conferences, podcasts and more, from genealogy societies, libraries, and other organizations all around the world.” It’s true. https://conferencekeeper.org/conference-keeper/

You may also be interested in the following conferences:

Free admission to virtual and in-person genealogy conferences, seminars such as Upcoming Webinars – Legacy Family Tree Webinars

The Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR) – hosts an annual Expo in Athens, GA, gagensociety.org

It is billed as the larges family genealogy conference in the world. It’s the virtual, RootsTech 2022 • FamilySearch

Genealogy Research in Military Records

The National Archives holds Federal military service records from the Revolutionary War to 1912 in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C. See details of holdings.

Military records from WWI – present are held in the National Military Personnel Records Center (NPRC), in St. Louis, Missouri, See details of holdings.

The National Archives does not hold state militia records. For these records, you will need to contact the appropriate State Archives.

Web link National Archives Genealogy Research in Military Records | National Archives

Libraries

THE best and “free” source in genealogy research begins at your friendly neighborhood library.  One library system that is used by Ann is the DeKalb County Public Library.  Having a library card gives you access to services such as  “Ask a Librarian” and broader research sites. Anyone may also request library cards in former home libraries across the nation. DeKalb County Public Library (dekalblibrary.org)

Find It! The Library of Congress https://www.loc.gov/pubrr/findit-faq.html

Located in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the Allen County Public Library has one of the largest genealogy collections in the United States.Home | Allen County Public Library (acpl.lib.in.us)

Nonpopulation Census Records

Nonpopulation census records can add “flesh” to the bones of ancestors and provide information about the communities in which they lived. Agriculture, mortality, and social statistics schedules are available for the census years of 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880. Manufacturing schedules are available for 1820, 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880. These records are arranged by state, then by county, and then by political subdivision (township, city, etc.). Schedules of business are available for 1935 for the following industries: advertising agencies, banking and financial institutions, miscellaneous enterprises, motor trucking for hire, public warehousing, and radio broadcasting stations.

Web link National Archives Nonpopulation Census Records | National Archives

Scholarships (a sampling)

Many scholarships are offered for budding genealogists – experienced ones and organizations.

Board For Certification Of Genealogists® Scholarship For African American Students

American Society Of Genealogists Scholar Award

AncestryProGenealogists® Scholarship

Frazine K. Taylor African American Research Scholarship

Georgia Public Library Service IGHR Scholarship

NextGen Scholarship

State Censuses

State censuses can be as important as the federal census to genealogists but, because they were taken randomly, remain a much-under-utilized resource in American genealogy. State censuses often can serve as substitutes for some of the missing federal census records – most notably the 1790, 1800, 1810, and 1890 censuses. Many state censuses also asked different questions than the federal census, thus recording information that cannot be found elsewhere in the federal schedules. While not all states took their own censuses, and some have not survived, state and local census records can be found in many locations. Most states which took censuses usually did so every 10 years, in years ending in “5” (1855, 1865, etc.) to complement the federal census. These state census records are most often found at the state archives or state library. Many are also on microfilm through a local Family History Center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and online via commercial genealogy databases.  State Censuses – History – U.S. Census Bureau

Addendum

Inaugural 2021 Genealogy Book published by Good Genes Genealogical Services

Amazon.com: Out of Sight: An Introduction to Unearthing Your African American and Afro-Caribbean Genealogy eBook : Wead, Dr. Ann Lineve, Owen, MS, Mark S.: Kindle Store

Published by Learning family histories

Our genealogy traces our family from western and central Africa and western Europe. Our ancestors entered the United States at the Virginia and Georgia Ports. First cousins Mark Owen and Ann Lineve Wead (it is protocol to use the maiden names of females in genealogy searches) are responsible for writing this blog. Although Ann has been involved in genealogy research while searching for certain ancestors since the age of 10, the cousins began deeper research of their families during the COVID-19 Pandemic Year of 2020. Devoting as much as 6 hours some evenings to the methodical training and research of genealogy, the cousins completed the year 2020 by earning genealogy certificates. Join us. @goodgenesgenealogy on wordpress and fb, twitter Sign up for our blog and enjoy the journey.

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