After 90 years: Amazing genealogy research techniques locates famous ancestor

Charles I. Brown gets proper burial A founder of the 109-year-old international Black male fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., was long “missing.” He is now found. For serious genealogy researchers, it is a joyful and encouraging example of how customized techniques resulted in a fraternity victory and for Black genealogy research. The absence ofContinue reading “After 90 years: Amazing genealogy research techniques locates famous ancestor”

Helping children plant and build their photo and other modern family trees

Ann of the Good Genes Genealogy Services team began her interest in family genealogy at the age of 10. After asking her mother and paternal grandfather separate questions about their childhoods, siblings, families and more, Ann did not receive the replies she expected. In both cases, I could hear crickets (old schoolers will get theContinue reading “Helping children plant and build their photo and other modern family trees”

How the passing of ancestors brings us life

Black Genealogy research requires attention to obits, homegoings and surviving family members Camden, Tenn. – About 340 miles northwest of Atlanta, lies a small community with a big heart that was originally named “Tranquility.”  The community counted as one of its more than 3,000 residents a special lady, Delia Mae Tharpe, mother of Dr. JackContinue reading “How the passing of ancestors brings us life”

Free worksheet to uncover the hard-to-find, brick wall family information

One of the best, free worksheets to conquer brick walls in Black genealogy searches is found in the easy-to-access and free databases of the National Archives. This worksheet is different from the family tree form that was recommended on this site via our post on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023. Both forms — the family treeContinue reading “Free worksheet to uncover the hard-to-find, brick wall family information”

The forgotten stories of “Black Magnolias” from Oakland Cemetery

First in a series Jihan Hurse, guide, Atlanta, GA.’s Oakland Cemetery’s “Black Magnolias” tour Atlanta, GA — On a chilly Saturday winter morning, Oakland Cemetery’s “Black Magnolias” Tour Guide and Author Jihan Hurse, excitedly gives highlights of the Black women who lie among its 70,000 “residents” in the city’s historic cemetery. The hour allotted forContinue reading “The forgotten stories of “Black Magnolias” from Oakland Cemetery”

Check out this wonderful Black genealogy program

Black Homesteaders of the South with Bernice A. Bennett On Saturday, February 4, 2023, 12 – 1:30 PM, the African American History and Culture Museum will host its African American History and Culture Event. It will be held on the Concourse, Oprah Winfrey Theater + streaming It’s free. It’s also recommended that you get tickets or register atContinue reading “Check out this wonderful Black genealogy program”

Celebrating January First … African American style

“What do the Africans do?” That is the question asked by a then-young girl, 11-year-old Terri Bandele, who was among the first families celebrating the first Kwanzaa celebration from Dec. 26, 1966 – Jan. 1, 1967. Her question and the organized determination of Dr. Maulana Karenga, Bandele’s parents and others, led to the creation ofContinue reading “Celebrating January First … African American style”

Grandmas’ hands creatively cooked cuisine in Nebraska kitchens

The Good Genes Genealogy team share maternal grandmothers. We benefited from tasty treats and meals from our Great-Grandmother Edna Wilkes Robinson, and equally great dinners and gatherings at the home of her daughter, our Grandmother Helen Wilkes Owen Douthy. In honor of the New Year, our thoughts and gratitude are in honor of both grandmothers’Continue reading “Grandmas’ hands creatively cooked cuisine in Nebraska kitchens”

Christmas is the reason for the season of escape for the enslaved

No matter how scarce the food, clothing and other resources, our enslaved Black ancestors found ways to celebrate Christmas. Reverend John Wright was a Presbyterian minister active in Cumberland County, Virginia, during the 1760s. On the Feast of the Epiphany, 1761, he wrote to several benefactors in England describing the following Christmas scene: “My landlord tells me,Continue reading “Christmas is the reason for the season of escape for the enslaved”