“And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

November 7, 2017 By Ncurrie, Posted In Finding Aids, Military, Tribute/News, World War I Era Today’s Blog is written by Barbara Lewis Burger, a retired National Archives Still Picture Senior Archivist The above photograph of nine World War I soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment is one of several iconic photographs in the National Archives and Records Administration that document African American soldiersContinue reading ““And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph”

#31 We are looking for you!

The African American families in the post-slavery, Reconstruction years See informationwanted.org The “Lost Friends Ad’ in a New Orleans newspaper in 1883 by a lady described with two names — Eliza Jane Elam and Eliza Owens — showed the dedication of former slaves who sought their loved ones some 20 years after the end ofContinue reading “#31 We are looking for you!”

What If Our History Was Written In Our Grammar?

News release, 19 August 2021 http://www.uzh.ch/en.html Humans have been always on the move, creating a complex history of languages and cultural traditions dispersed over the globe. An international team under UZH’s lead has now traced families of related languages over more than 10,000 years by combining data from genetics, linguistics and musicology using novel digitalContinue reading “What If Our History Was Written In Our Grammar?”

Historical 1918 pandemic reports, advice, treatments and hope for our ancestors

This report from Chicago, Illinois by health officials in 1918 reads like a one that could have been written in 2021. The upshot is that we should learn from our ancestors. Meanwhile, similar messages were urgently distributed that are similar to those of 2020-21. Another similar health heed Consider the following in the current pandemicsContinue reading “Historical 1918 pandemic reports, advice, treatments and hope for our ancestors”

#29 The Great September U.S. Compromises (Part One)

On September 18 and 20, 1850, history recorded two distinct “compromises” that impacted African American lives. Part One, we will look at what life became in the area now known as Washington, D.C., once Congress came together and compromised on legislation. The ‘give and take” of 1850 The 20th of September marked the signing ofContinue reading “#29 The Great September U.S. Compromises (Part One)”

We Grow From Healthy Soil Planted by our Ancestors

SATURDAY, JULY 24, 2021” I GROW FROM HEALTHY SOIL “ Source: daily_thoughts_from_the_hill@hillsideinternational.org     ” Our ancestors planted us in rich, fertile soil. They fertilized our soil with their energy, thoughts, and deeds. They fought for us. They struggled for us. They set standards, values, and examples of how to calibrate the moral compass. They left a legacyContinue reading “We Grow From Healthy Soil Planted by our Ancestors”

#25 Black Pioneer Settlers Move from Kentucky Green to Plains’ Grass: How the first and only remaining black town west of the Mississippi was developed

A lot was going on in 1877 for African Americans in the U.S. South. It was enough to drive them West in search of the promised land. For blacks in the Georgetown, Kentucky area, their Sunday morning worship services were interrupted by real estate speculators. They offered an opportunity to move west to establish homesteadsContinue reading “#25 Black Pioneer Settlers Move from Kentucky Green to Plains’ Grass: How the first and only remaining black town west of the Mississippi was developed”

#24 Your ancestors in college

A recent weekend webinar about slave history in the physical building of the University of Georgia in Athens, supports the extended research that traces African Americans’ involvement on campuses across the nation. Even worse in Athens, UGA’s Baldwin Hall just completed its unearthing and findings of the bones of former slaves who were buried beneathContinue reading “#24 Your ancestors in college”