“Negroes catching small catfish with their hands. Bait to be used in shoals of Little River near Eatonton, Georgia” — U.S. Library of Congress

It’s time for you to dig those old photos out of boxes, closets and other places to display for us to share in your family history.

Check out Putnam County. Let’s guess the year!

Black History Things to Do: Benjamin Banneker’s Home Story | Healthy Kyla

Check out this cool site. Time to get out and experience the USA history makers.

https://stories.app.goo.gl/S4di

Something different for Freebie Friday: Part-time Research Assistant Job in GA

Photo by Liza Summer on Pexels.com

GEORGIA ARCHIVES

The Georgia Archives, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, invites applications for a part-time Administrative Research Assistant for an NEH grant.

SUMMARY

The Administrative Research Assistant will be a member of a team working on a National Endowment for the Humanities grant-funded project to identify Georgia records regarding the state’s response to desegregation. The end goal for this project is to present interactive in-house and virtual classes and tours for college and university professors, and students. Responsibilities of this position include finding documents to support the goals of the project.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Identify documents regarding segregation, desegregation, and the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia in Georgia Archives collections through research and select material appropriate for higher education classes and the general public.
  • Research online newspapers to find articles on Georgia’s response to desegregation.
  • Look through Georgia’s Supreme Court cases to find related cases on segregation and desegregation.
  • Perform background research on documents when needed for context.
  • Scan records using proper equipment.
  • Perform data entry to record the location and description of documents in collections and note which documents need conservation work.
  • Scan and enhance digital records for use in PowerPoint presentations.
  • Support logistic activities for classroom and public presentations and exhibits.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

  • Ability to use Microsoft Office programs.
  • Knowledge of the history of the state of Georgia.
  • Knowledge of historical methods.
  • Skill in scanning documents.
  • Skill in interpersonal communications with colleagues.
  • Skill in project planning, implementation, and management

QUALIFICATIONS

Educational Requirements
Associates degree.

Required Experience
More than one year of experience performing clerical or administrative work.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Bachelor’s degree in history with coursework in 20th Century American history or African American history.
  • Familiarity with Civil Rights history.
  • Experience performing research at an archives.

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The University System Office is an equal employment, equal access, and equal educational opportunity, and affirmative action institution. It is the policy of the University System Office to recruit, hire, train, promote and educate persons without regard to race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, gender, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or veteran status as required by applicable state and federal laws (including Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, Sections 503, and 504, ADEA, ADA, E.O. 11246, and Rev. Proc. 75-50).

For questions or more detailed information regarding this policy please contact the University System Office Human Resources at 404.962.3242. Individuals requiring disability related accommodations for participation in any event or to obtain print materials in an alternative format, please contact Human Resources.

EMPLOYER INFORMATION

Founded in 1918, the Georgia Archives identifies, collects, provides access to, and preserves Georgia’s historic records.  As the state archives of Georgia, one of the original thirteen colonies, the Georgia Archives holds a rich collection of colonial and state records covering nearly three centuries.  Of the 85,000 cubic feet of records in the Georgia Archives, approximately 72,000 are official state records, 6,000 are local government records, and 7,000 are non-governmental (manuscript) collections.  The Georgia Archives maintains a library collection of 23,000 books, pamphlets, and periodicals.  The Georgia Archives, as a unit of the Board of Regents, is not part of a specific institution of higher education.  The Board of Regents is a state agency.

LOCATION

The Georgia Archives is located at 5800 Jonesboro Road, Morrow, Georgia, and is adjacent to Clayton State University and the National Archives at Atlanta.  Morrow is in Clayton County and is part of the Atlanta metropolitan area.  Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is about 20 minutes away.

SALARY

This temporary position pays $14.81 per hour and will end no later than the end of year 2022.

BACKGROUND CHECK

A successful background check will be required for successful candidate prior to hiring.

FREEBIE FRIDAY!

Join this listing, especially if you know the names of your families’ enslavers. Even if you are like us and have not confirmed those names, join the ones who have located this part of their legacies.

https://beyondkin.org/enslaved-populations-research-directory/?s=09

Closing the Month of Sankofa with Ancestral Prayer and Healing

The gathering for ancestral prayer and healing at Hillside International Truth Center, Atlanta, GA

On a warm Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022, Hillside’s Presiding Bishop Dr. Jack L. Bomar, led the sacred, community “Ancestral Prayer” ceremony. It included drumming that girded the rhymical and ancestral honoring blessings with the pouring of libations by Hillside member Sharon A. Smith. Today, she said, “I am the High Priestess” while acknowledging the oldest person attending the ceremony to give her the permission to continue.

The ceremony was the culmination of a monthlong series of genealogy workshops led by the Good Genes Genealogy Services team. GGGS donated its services to its host, Hillside International Truth Center, which is undergoing a massive renovation on the church’s nearly 50-year-old facility.

The outdoor ceremony was highlighted by Bishop Bomar leading the attendees in a process that began with everyone listing their ancestors on a blue sheet of paper. Everyone was asked to call the names of the ancestors and affirm the following prayer:

Some 60 persons recited the prayer and continued their family ceremony to remove any negative Karma they felt towards ancestors, and they symbolically cancelled all ancestral debt with the purpose of their families moving forward in all levels of prosperity.

The family history in Sankofa Genealogy

PRESENTED BY VALERIE TOLIVER IN THE FORM OF A COLLAGE

During the month of February 2022, Good Genes Genealogy Services presented three Saturday virtual classes involving family ancestry and genealogy.

Theme: “Walk With Our Ancestors

Participants: Adults.

Assignment: Express families’ histories in varied formats. Others showcased their various projects. All shared with classmates to spark deeper ancestral questions, comments.

Here’s Valerie Toliver’s compelling story about her journey:

Genealogy project 

February 19, 2022 

My History, A journey Through Time 

This collage encompasses my journey from my homeland, Africa! In doing the African Ancestry DNA test, it was determined that my matriclan test (my mother’s maternal roots) results were for the Yoruba Tribe in Nigeria. A female cousin on my father’s side did the matriclan test as well. Her results determined the maternal roots for my father’s family. The results were the Yoruba and Hausa tribes also of Nigeria. Thus, I have included the flag of Nigeria as well as the symbols for both Yoruba and Hausa on my collage.  

In my genealogy research over the years, I have been able to uncover 5 enslavers of my maternal and paternal ancestors. I have this list of surnames included in my collage. At this time, I have verified only one of the enslavers as being a DNA connection. My maternal great-great grandfather was enslaved and fathered by a member of the Shields family who originated in Scotland/Ireland. I don’t have a picture of the enslaver, but I have included pictures of one of his son’s and grandson’s. I also have included a picture of the DNA match that I have with one of his descendants, my 4-6th cousin. Their family shield, along with the copy of the will showing the sale of my ancestor to a 2nd enslaver is on the collage as well. I’m continuing to research the other 3 enslavers for my family. I have included a copy of the slave list for one enslaver and a reimbursement for funds owed to one of the enslavers for allowing my ancestor to serve in the United Stated Colored Troops. The signage used to lure more of the Black people, both enslaved and free, to serve in the Civil War is depicted in my project as well.  

The culmination of items included are: pictures of my maternal and paternal ancestors, churches they attended, cities and states they lived in, articles from the “colored news “, the gravestones of my enslaved great-great grandfather and great-great grandmother, my grandfather’s barn and the stone memorial erected at my mother’s childhood church listing the members that have transitioned since 1870. My mother cut the ribbon for this historic wall only a few years prior to her transition in 2020. At the time, she was the oldest member in age and years of attendance that still attended the church.  

This project started out just as a small collage to acknowledge Black History Month. It became much more as I stood in my truth about who I am and how I came to be.  

I am my ancestors’ wildest dreams. I am God’s child.  

Valerie Toliver 

Just in time for our Sankofa Genealogy class

Third class in series: Saturday, Feb. 19, 2022

10 – 11 a.m.

Read Rev. Sandy Rodgers‘ tribute in honor of our ancestor! Congrats to all class members who are willingly expressing their appreciation to our ancestors by producing creative works today.

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