Black History is American History

Listing of great events around the USA

Researching genealogy and family histories are exciting activities. Equally thrilling are the research results coming to life in the form of podcasts, blogs, puzzles, articles, affirmations, proclamations, presentations, stage plays, films, clothing and other expressions of our ancestors’ rich legacies.

Here’s a partial listing of the Black History Month programs, activities and other recognitions throughout the United States:

President Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings Descendant Gayle Jessup White – African-American Burial Ground, Monticello

How to attend and be present for the future

  • Remember to bring along a notepad, whether electronic or paper. My youngest son brings his Braille notetaker.
  • Listen to the genealogy and ancestry points of information that relate to your current and future research.
  • Ask questions and make comments about what matters to you. At one of my recent online seminars, a participant asked that I return to former slides to review the listing of great resources for genealogy research.
  • Provide feedback to the event host. The feedback and especially the recommendations for topics of future topics, remain important to event hosts.
  • Relax and release so that you may enjoy and learn from every activity and program.

Start where you are: Share your family’s history

About 12 years ago, I received important advice from an Arkansas special collections librarian. She asked me to share my paternal family’s history as I discovered it — bit by bit.

I recall telling her that I did not have much to report on my grandfather, Samuel Luster Weed (now Wead), and his family who lived in Helena, Arkansas during the bloody summer of 1919 in the Delta region. She said, “even if you have one page to share, share it.” This librarian was responsible for my brick wall breakthrough as she found Big PaPa Wead. I am forever grateful.

A rare photo of my grandfather, Sampson Luster Wead in the 1950s at a civil rights protest.

I did. By sharing, a one-page document, I learned that too few documents are shared with family, libraries, museums and other entities. Today, Rhonda Stewart, is the Genealogy & Local History Specialist at Central Arkansas Library System. I am sure that she is still encouraging her library patrons — whether virtual or in-person — to share their stories.

Start where you are

Start where you are. That is the straight-forward message I received from Rhonda. It applies to new and seasoned genealogy and family ancestry researchers.

Thank you, Rhonda.

I have been repeating that refrain since then. I will repeat it again soon during the annual Sankofa Genealogy monthlong celebrations hosted by Atlanta, Ga.’s Hillside International Truth Center. During our Saturday Sankofa Genealogy workshops, our emphasis is to encourage participants to show their work. Do as Rhonda wisely advised me, share their stories. As the Ghanian Sankofa bird teaches us, reach back to retrieve what is lost while moving forward as its body shows.

http://www.shokopress.com

Start where you are … again.

Start where you are.

I recently received an email prompt from the TV network, NBC. It showcased a story about a lady who “struck” black family genealogy gold by linking her family’s past to that of Abolitionist Harriet Tubman. Another NBC story that aired a year ago was also a great bright light. It featured a boy dressed up like his favorite news anchor who became an ancestor. It is an example of starting where you are. I am sure that Rhonda is proud. I am.

Tips for starting where you are in family research

  1. Begin with your research question or purpose. It could be you are looking to find at least one family member from your mother’s or father’s ancestors.
  2. Ask questions among family members, even if you are repeating yourself. You may be surprised with their new responses to you.
  3. Seek the help from a librarian, a historian, a genealogist and newspaper by utilizing surnames that you are familiar with. Make sure you spell the surname at least seven different ways.
  4. If you are seeking a female ancestor, know that her married name may cause many brick walls. Seek her maiden name, albeit it is usually a tough search.
  5. Publish, write, speak or produce a video. Create a one-page document as I did to break the ice of publishing my research, thanks to Rhonda.
  6. Start where you are.

Join us — February 2022 Sankofa webinar!

February is the perfect month to journey with our ancestors. For the second year, Good Genes Genealogy Services LLC, will offer a series of Saturday morning, live and virtual workshops that follow the principles of the Ghana, Africa Sankofa bird.

Your donation benefits the programming of Hillside International Truth Center.

You may register on this site. It is super easy and all of the proceeds are dedicated to Hillside International Truth Center. The amount of the workshop is nominal and it correlates to Hillside’s “22 Days of Sankofa Transformation.”

“Sankofa” is a Ghanaian word that translated means “Go back and fetch it.” It also refers to a mythical bird whose feet are firmly planted forward while its head is turned backwards carrying a precious egg in its mouth.
It symbolizes the belief that the past serves as a guide for planning the future. It represents a people’s quest for knowledge with the implication that the quest is based on critical examination, and intelligent and patient investigation.


Twenty-two (22) is a powerful number. Two (2) is a rare prime number. Twenty-two represents a double prime, and when added, it equals the number “four” (4). In numerology, 22 is considered a Master number.

February is known as the month of love, is marked by the American Heart Association, and is the USA’s Black History Month of recognition and celebration. The power of love is always with me. The recent deaths of loved ones from matters of the heart impact my soul. The annual recognition of Black History Month honors our ancestors — whether African American, Irish American, Afro Caribbean American and more.

Tips for a worthwhile attendee to this workshop series:

  • Be open and receptive to learning new facts about our ancestors;
  • Expect to receive reminders and prompts about ancestry and genealogy;
  • Challenge yourself to move your basic or lengthy family ancestry research to production;
  • Be prepared to participate fully in the Sankofa Genealogy classes, especially in weeks three (3) and four (4); and
  • Enjoy the classes and if possible, the in-person ancestral healing ceremony on the last Saturday of February.

A word of gratitude: The workshops conducted by Mark S. Owen and Ann Wead Kimbrough, are made possible through the collective production team of ministers. They are Bishop Jack Bomar, Drs. Marian Gamble and Tony Burks II, Revs. Sharon Hodnett and Senay Johnson.

Free podcast debuts Jan. 31, 2022: Jim Crow-era athletic ancestors’ stories featured

“As If We Were Ghosts” is a documentary produced by my company, Stonecrest, Ga-based OURS Studios. The documentary will premiere on Juneteenth 2022 on Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Eric Roberts (erobtv) is the host of the series. Here’s a preview.

https://www.instagram.com/atl_erob/p/CZPXLPfOog2/?utm_medium=share_sheet

Watch 90+-year old Xi Xi Zeta Charter Member Share History on YouTube

Remember to capture loved ones during special moments that will benefit ancestral legacies.
Here’s a multi-media capture of an important lady who just joined the ancestors.

Wead Write Away and Genealogy by Ann

March 16, 2021 marked our grad chapter’s 32nd anniversary. This retro video was recorded in 2019, Lithonia, Georgia.

My Legacy Soror Mom are among XiXiZeta’s founding. Listen, learn and love!


Here’s our history as scribed by Mom, Angie Wead and my Sister-Mom, Mary Martin-Blackmon.

FOUNDING FACTS:

ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY, INC

XI XI ZETA CHAPTER, LITHONIA, GEORGIA

MARCH 16, 1989

Soror Dove Dr. Genova H. Lawrence saw a need to form a Zeta Phi Beta chapter in the Lithonia, Georgia area, when several women approached her with an interest in becoming Zetas. She had also met other graduate Sorors, who wanted to reclaim. Shen then called a meeting at her home to organize a chapter, after she met for several months with prospective Sorors and graduate Sorors. Note: Soror Lawrence attended all Boule’s and met the five founders and three Sigmas (who assisted in the founding of the Sorority).

The…

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Create your great today for tomorrow

How to tips

Live your best lives and record your stories. We have a limited amount of time in this earth realm. How are you preparing to leave lasting legacies? Keep in mind our future generations. Namaste.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2022 I AM HERE FOR THE GLORY OF GOD

You are here to change the world. Future generations will reap the harvest of your good works. Shine and shine brightly — excerpt Daily Thoughts from the Hill daily_thoughts_from_the_hill@hillsideinternational.org.


How to preserve great legacies

  • Create a print, audio and/or video gratitude journal and strive to record your successes, victories, small wonders and more in it each day. If you already have a gratitude, continue to record.
  • If you have or are creating a print gratitude journal, add photos and if possible, audio and video evidence of the good you are enjoying.
  • On those so-called “sad” or “bad” days, dig deep and find at least one object, person or situation that brought sunshine to your lives.
  • Consider presenting excerpts from your gratitude journal in a family or friends setting such as a reunion, holiday or just because.
  • Consider where you will place your gratitude journal so that future generations may view it. Online ancestry sites and other technology-based cloud storage locations are worth exploring.

Honorable lives today for tomorrow

Angels in ancestry

The link contains wonderful words of advice. It reminds us that we are future ancestors.

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