MONDAY MAY 30, 2022I STAND ON THE SHOULDERS OF MY ANCESTORSYour connection to your ancestors is the shortest path to God. Whatever your connection to your ancestors is- whether it is a heart connection or whether it is a distant memory- they are a part of you. And you are a part of them. Your connection with them transcends lost stories, names, and pictures. You are here because of them, and their soul lives in your heart, bones, and flesh. I stand on the shoulders of my ancestors. I know that whether I know their stories or not, I am connected to them. We are bound together by a divine web of life. I call on them every day. I call on my biological ancestors, as well as my spiritual ancestors. My connection with my ancestors gives me life. It is my foundation. Thank you, Power, in me, through me, as me, around me, through the Christ within. And so it is.Honor your father and your mother,that your days may be long upon the landwhich the Lord your God gives you.Exodus 20:12Daily Thoughts from the HillCopyright: Hillside International Truth Center, Inc.Bishop Dr. Jack L. Bomar – Executive BishopBishop Dr. Barbara L. King – Founder

From the resting place of Clark Atlanta University’s first president, Dr. Thomas Cole, Jr., to ancestors of other families, to relics of our past, our history is never forgotten.

How to stay out of “trouble” when posting ancestry, genealogy, historic finds

One of the best ways to attract the attention of the genealogy “police” is to utilize materials that are either copyright protected or belong to private collections. Instead, find the copyright owners and utilize government archives and subscription services — including those that require fees — to remain free and clear in your postings. For instance, my subscription with WordPress entitles me to pull photos from its files.

Photo by Kerde Severin on Pexels.com

Some tips:

  1. Remember to first check the copyright status of any document or visual element when preparing to post the material in the so-called public domain. Social media is considered public domain. Social media is not considered the public domain. It may seem as if I was double-speaking. I am and I am not. Here’s why:

Just because something has been posted to Instagram, Twitter, or other social media platforms does not mean that content is now in the public domain and free for anyone to use. Social media is no different than other forms of online content — the content creator retains the copyrights to any images, text, or video he or she created. When reusing content found on the internet it’s vitally important to make sure you have obtained the right to do so from the content owner.

https://www.freeadvice.com/legal/who-owns-the-content-posted-on-social-media/

2. I usually post content and pictures that are derived from my personal files, including photographs taken by me or someone who have given the “rights” for me to do so.

Source: Ancestry, family files.


3. I usually seek photos to reuse that are from public sources such as the National Archives, Georgia Archives, newspapers and other media where the ownership is clearly stated. Please add the citations that are conveniently provided by the public site. For instance, the Digital Library of Georgia via GALILEO, offers five tabs on its site that include “cite.” Click on that tab and you will find the following for the photo that I am posting:

Citations
Photograph of the parent teacher association booth at the fair, Manchester, Georgia, 1953
MLA
Not Available. “Photograph of the parent teacher association booth at the fair, Manchester, Georgia, 1953.” Pine Mountain Regional Library. 1953, http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/pinemountain/do:bhtc53312.
APA
Not Available (1953). Photograph of the parent teacher association booth at the fair, Manchester, Georgia, 1953. Retrieved from http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/pinemountain/do:bhtc53312
Chicago
Not Available. “Photograph of the parent teacher association booth at the fair, Manchester, Georgia, 1953.” 1953. May 4, 2022. http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/pinemountain/do:bhtc53312.
https://dlg.usg.edu/record/gbp_bhtc_bhtc53312

https://dlg.usg.edu/record/gbp_bhtc_bhtc53312

4. Below is the content that accompanies the above photograph. I post it with a sigh of relief that all copyright and/or free use content is acceptable.

Collection:Pine Mountain Regional Library CollectionTitle:Photograph of the parent teacher association booth at the fair, Manchester, Georgia, 1953Date of Original:1953Subject:Parents and teachers assocations–Georgia–Manchester
Fairs–Georgia–Manchester
Coca Cola (Trademark)
Concessions (Amusements, etc.)–Georgia–Manchester
African American children–Georgia–ManchesterLocation:United States, Georgia, Meriwether County, Manchester, 32.85985, -84.61993Medium:photographsType:StillImageFormat:image/jpegDescription:Photograph captioned “The PTA booth doesn’t seem as busy as the Woman’s Club booth at present.” Two girls and a boy stand in front of the parent teacher association booth at the Tri-County Fair in Manchester, Georgia.Metadata URL:http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/id:gbp_bhtc_bhtc53312Digital Object URL:http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/pinemountain/do:bhtc53312Language:engOriginal Collection:Pine Mountain Regional Library, Manchester, GeorgiaHolding Institution:Pine Mountain Regional LibraryRights:

Locations

1 locations associated with this record

https://dlg.usg.edu/record/gbp_bhtc_bhtc53312

5. Be careful with the use of music as copyright infringement cases are plentiful in this category. Yet, there are many ways to work around using music in your genealogy spaces with safety and care. My advice:

Keep your ancestry genealogy research fun and worthwhile. The best way is to avoid collisions with those who troll with the intent to make innocent mistakes a big deal.

“Decide what you want, decide what you are willing to exchange for it, establish your priorities and go to work.” Anonymous

Fun Family history via public photos

How I found myself in random research

Omaha, Nebraska in 1966 with my family and me at the opening of the “pocket playground.” Mayor A.V. Sorensen (foreground) addresses the group that includes my Dad (with basketball) and me on the right side of him.


The next time you look at a public photo, take a second and third look. Look at little closer.

I did just that and discovered a few gems that otherwise would remain barely etched into my childhood memories. At the picture in this blog feed, you will notice a Black man with a basketball. That’s my Dad, Dr. Rodney S. Wead. I am right next to his right, left from our view. I also noticed my maternal grandmother, Helen Douthy (the sunglasses and bonnet-like hat) holding the hand of my cousin, Lori. Lori’s mother, Aunt Greta, is holding my other cousin, Debbie.

Franklin Elementary School playground time in 1969.

I was 11 years old when this photo was take at Franklin Elementary School. Always the tallest girl in each grade, it helps now that my height helps to identify me in a crowd such as this one.


My paternal grandfather, Sampson Wead, is pictured in what was a rare sighting. He was a member of the DePorres Club and they were protesting Reed Ice Cream not hiring Black workers. That took a lot to do in the 1950s for Black folk no matter the location.

Sampson Wead, foreground left, is identified by me in this 1953 photo.

What a bonus!

Documenting the Boyhood Hometown of a Legendary Jazz Musician

A recent visit to East St. Louis, I’ll., yielded highs and lows.

Jazz musician ancestor Miles Davis grew up in the deep South…that is, southern Illinois. Nearby Davis’ boyhood home are stark images of ravaged homes such as this one I captured while riding in the back seat of a SUV.

What are you capturing? Anywhere you are, I’m sure famous folk have walked those same streets. Research. Record. Reward your genealogy work.

Somewhere in East St. Louis, IL. April 2022

“Negroes catching small catfish with their hands. Bait to be used in shoals of Little River near Eatonton, Georgia” — U.S. Library of Congress

It’s time for you to dig those old photos out of boxes, closets and other places to display for us to share in your family history.

Check out Putnam County. Let’s guess the year!

Black History Things to Do: Benjamin Banneker’s Home Story | Healthy Kyla

Check out this cool site. Time to get out and experience the USA history makers.

https://stories.app.goo.gl/S4di

Something different for Freebie Friday: Part-time Research Assistant Job in GA

Photo by Liza Summer on Pexels.com

GEORGIA ARCHIVES

The Georgia Archives, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, invites applications for a part-time Administrative Research Assistant for an NEH grant.

SUMMARY

The Administrative Research Assistant will be a member of a team working on a National Endowment for the Humanities grant-funded project to identify Georgia records regarding the state’s response to desegregation. The end goal for this project is to present interactive in-house and virtual classes and tours for college and university professors, and students. Responsibilities of this position include finding documents to support the goals of the project.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Identify documents regarding segregation, desegregation, and the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia in Georgia Archives collections through research and select material appropriate for higher education classes and the general public.
  • Research online newspapers to find articles on Georgia’s response to desegregation.
  • Look through Georgia’s Supreme Court cases to find related cases on segregation and desegregation.
  • Perform background research on documents when needed for context.
  • Scan records using proper equipment.
  • Perform data entry to record the location and description of documents in collections and note which documents need conservation work.
  • Scan and enhance digital records for use in PowerPoint presentations.
  • Support logistic activities for classroom and public presentations and exhibits.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

  • Ability to use Microsoft Office programs.
  • Knowledge of the history of the state of Georgia.
  • Knowledge of historical methods.
  • Skill in scanning documents.
  • Skill in interpersonal communications with colleagues.
  • Skill in project planning, implementation, and management

QUALIFICATIONS

Educational Requirements
Associates degree.

Required Experience
More than one year of experience performing clerical or administrative work.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Bachelor’s degree in history with coursework in 20th Century American history or African American history.
  • Familiarity with Civil Rights history.
  • Experience performing research at an archives.

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The University System Office is an equal employment, equal access, and equal educational opportunity, and affirmative action institution. It is the policy of the University System Office to recruit, hire, train, promote and educate persons without regard to race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, gender, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or veteran status as required by applicable state and federal laws (including Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, Sections 503, and 504, ADEA, ADA, E.O. 11246, and Rev. Proc. 75-50).

For questions or more detailed information regarding this policy please contact the University System Office Human Resources at 404.962.3242. Individuals requiring disability related accommodations for participation in any event or to obtain print materials in an alternative format, please contact Human Resources.

EMPLOYER INFORMATION

Founded in 1918, the Georgia Archives identifies, collects, provides access to, and preserves Georgia’s historic records.  As the state archives of Georgia, one of the original thirteen colonies, the Georgia Archives holds a rich collection of colonial and state records covering nearly three centuries.  Of the 85,000 cubic feet of records in the Georgia Archives, approximately 72,000 are official state records, 6,000 are local government records, and 7,000 are non-governmental (manuscript) collections.  The Georgia Archives maintains a library collection of 23,000 books, pamphlets, and periodicals.  The Georgia Archives, as a unit of the Board of Regents, is not part of a specific institution of higher education.  The Board of Regents is a state agency.

LOCATION

The Georgia Archives is located at 5800 Jonesboro Road, Morrow, Georgia, and is adjacent to Clayton State University and the National Archives at Atlanta.  Morrow is in Clayton County and is part of the Atlanta metropolitan area.  Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is about 20 minutes away.

SALARY

This temporary position pays $14.81 per hour and will end no later than the end of year 2022.

BACKGROUND CHECK

A successful background check will be required for successful candidate prior to hiring.

FREEBIE FRIDAY!

Join this listing, especially if you know the names of your families’ enslavers. Even if you are like us and have not confirmed those names, join the ones who have located this part of their legacies.

https://beyondkin.org/enslaved-populations-research-directory/?s=09

Closing the Month of Sankofa with Ancestral Prayer and Healing

The gathering for ancestral prayer and healing at Hillside International Truth Center, Atlanta, GA

On a warm Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022, Hillside’s Presiding Bishop Dr. Jack L. Bomar, led the sacred, community “Ancestral Prayer” ceremony. It included drumming that girded the rhymical and ancestral honoring blessings with the pouring of libations by Hillside member Sharon A. Smith. Today, she said, “I am the High Priestess” while acknowledging the oldest person attending the ceremony to give her the permission to continue.

The ceremony was the culmination of a monthlong series of genealogy workshops led by the Good Genes Genealogy Services team. GGGS donated its services to its host, Hillside International Truth Center, which is undergoing a massive renovation on the church’s nearly 50-year-old facility.

The outdoor ceremony was highlighted by Bishop Bomar leading the attendees in a process that began with everyone listing their ancestors on a blue sheet of paper. Everyone was asked to call the names of the ancestors and affirm the following prayer:

Some 60 persons recited the prayer and continued their family ceremony to remove any negative Karma they felt towards ancestors, and they symbolically cancelled all ancestral debt with the purpose of their families moving forward in all levels of prosperity.

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