Join us — February 2022 Sankofa webinar!

February is the perfect month to journey with our ancestors. For the second year, Good Genes Genealogy Services LLC, will offer a series of Saturday morning, live and virtual workshops that follow the principles of the Ghana, Africa Sankofa bird.

Your donation benefits the programming of Hillside International Truth Center.

You may register on this site. It is super easy and all of the proceeds are dedicated to Hillside International Truth Center. The amount of the workshop is nominal and it correlates to Hillside’s “22 Days of Sankofa Transformation.”

“Sankofa” is a Ghanaian word that translated means “Go back and fetch it.” It also refers to a mythical bird whose feet are firmly planted forward while its head is turned backwards carrying a precious egg in its mouth.
It symbolizes the belief that the past serves as a guide for planning the future. It represents a people’s quest for knowledge with the implication that the quest is based on critical examination, and intelligent and patient investigation.


Twenty-two (22) is a powerful number. Two (2) is a rare prime number. Twenty-two represents a double prime, and when added, it equals the number “four” (4). In numerology, 22 is considered a Master number.

February is known as the month of love, is marked by the American Heart Association, and is the USA’s Black History Month of recognition and celebration. The power of love is always with me. The recent deaths of loved ones from matters of the heart impact my soul. The annual recognition of Black History Month honors our ancestors — whether African American, Irish American, Afro Caribbean American and more.

Tips for a worthwhile attendee to this workshop series:

  • Be open and receptive to learning new facts about our ancestors;
  • Expect to receive reminders and prompts about ancestry and genealogy;
  • Challenge yourself to move your basic or lengthy family ancestry research to production;
  • Be prepared to participate fully in the Sankofa Genealogy classes, especially in weeks three (3) and four (4); and
  • Enjoy the classes and if possible, the in-person ancestral healing ceremony on the last Saturday of February.

A word of gratitude: The workshops conducted by Mark S. Owen and Ann Wead Kimbrough, are made possible through the collective production team of ministers. They are Bishop Jack Bomar, Drs. Marian Gamble and Tony Burks II, Revs. Sharon Hodnett and Senay Johnson.

Free podcast debuts Jan. 31, 2022: Jim Crow-era athletic ancestors’ stories featured

“As If We Were Ghosts” is a documentary produced by my company, Stonecrest, Ga-based OURS Studios. The documentary will premiere on Juneteenth 2022 on Georgia Public Broadcasting.

Eric Roberts (erobtv) is the host of the series. Here’s a preview.

https://www.instagram.com/atl_erob/p/CZPXLPfOog2/?utm_medium=share_sheet

Watch 90+-year old Xi Xi Zeta Charter Member Share History on YouTube

Remember to capture loved ones during special moments that will benefit ancestral legacies.
Here’s a multi-media capture of an important lady who just joined the ancestors.

Wead Write Away and Genealogy by Ann

March 16, 2021 marked our grad chapter’s 32nd anniversary. This retro video was recorded in 2019, Lithonia, Georgia.

My Legacy Soror Mom are among XiXiZeta’s founding. Listen, learn and love!


Here’s our history as scribed by Mom, Angie Wead and my Sister-Mom, Mary Martin-Blackmon.

FOUNDING FACTS:

ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY, INC

XI XI ZETA CHAPTER, LITHONIA, GEORGIA

MARCH 16, 1989

Soror Dove Dr. Genova H. Lawrence saw a need to form a Zeta Phi Beta chapter in the Lithonia, Georgia area, when several women approached her with an interest in becoming Zetas. She had also met other graduate Sorors, who wanted to reclaim. Shen then called a meeting at her home to organize a chapter, after she met for several months with prospective Sorors and graduate Sorors. Note: Soror Lawrence attended all Boule’s and met the five founders and three Sigmas (who assisted in the founding of the Sorority).

The…

View original post 347 more words

Create your great today for tomorrow

How to tips

Live your best lives and record your stories. We have a limited amount of time in this earth realm. How are you preparing to leave lasting legacies? Keep in mind our future generations. Namaste.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 2022 I AM HERE FOR THE GLORY OF GOD

You are here to change the world. Future generations will reap the harvest of your good works. Shine and shine brightly — excerpt Daily Thoughts from the Hill daily_thoughts_from_the_hill@hillsideinternational.org.


How to preserve great legacies

  • Create a print, audio and/or video gratitude journal and strive to record your successes, victories, small wonders and more in it each day. If you already have a gratitude, continue to record.
  • If you have or are creating a print gratitude journal, add photos and if possible, audio and video evidence of the good you are enjoying.
  • On those so-called “sad” or “bad” days, dig deep and find at least one object, person or situation that brought sunshine to your lives.
  • Consider presenting excerpts from your gratitude journal in a family or friends setting such as a reunion, holiday or just because.
  • Consider where you will place your gratitude journal so that future generations may view it. Online ancestry sites and other technology-based cloud storage locations are worth exploring.

Honorable lives today for tomorrow

Angels in ancestry

The link contains wonderful words of advice. It reminds us that we are future ancestors.

Freebie Friday: Historical mapping



I was moved by a newspaper columnist’s description of the great flood in the 1940s that invaded my hometown, Omaha, Nebraska and neighboring city, Council Bluffs, Iowa. What led me to this article was an active conversation I was having with my parents about a time when the entire community pulled together to help one another.

My Dad and his buddies were drafted to help build structures to help fend off the water disaster that paralyzed the area for several weeks.

As I listened to their separate remembrances, I was scanning the flooded areas via today’s Internet. There were empty spaces where houses and businesses once stood, while stronger structures remaining upon the soggy grounds.

What was my fantastic tool to locate the historical Iowa and Nebraska? It’s the Freebie Friday “My Genealogy Hound.” It’s a great website with more than 2,100 historic county maps from throughout the United States. I’ve found it helpful when I was researching my ancestors in Georgia. I wanted to see where my paternal family lived in Helena, Arkansas in 1919, and our (Good Genes Genealogy team) maternal relatives’ homes and businesses in Springfield, Missouri between 1900 and 1945.

Some maps don’t allow the researcher to drill down and find every old road that I was seeking. Yet, most of the county maps give me a great sense of the areas.


There’s at least one county map for every county in the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia and West Virginia.

Only partial lists exist for the remaining U.S. states. Within all states, more county maps are regularly added.

Enjoy your genealogy geography hunting!

%d bloggers like this: