#6 “Roll, Jordan, Roll” and other great slave songs coded with freedom terms

The coded song for escaped slaves, “Roll, Jordan, Roll,” was one of many notable works captured by a young musicologist and published in 1867. Lucy McKim was 19-years-old when she traveled with her abolitionist father in 1862 to the Sea Islands of Georgia for a three-week visit to check on the conditions of recently freedContinue reading “#6 “Roll, Jordan, Roll” and other great slave songs coded with freedom terms”

#4 “Out of Sight”: An Introduction to Unearthing Your African American and Afro-Caribbean Genealogy

A complimentary copy of portions of an e-book written by First Cousins Dr. Ann Wead Kimbrough and Mark S. Owen, MS Awaiting Final Editing and Proof from Publisher. © Copy right (2021) by Dr. Ann Lineve Wead and Mark S. Owen, MS, Good Genes Genealogy Services – All rights reserved. It is not legal toContinue reading “#4 “Out of Sight”: An Introduction to Unearthing Your African American and Afro-Caribbean Genealogy”

#3 Gems from Ancestry Gems

Mama Helen, my maternal grandmother, had the most extensive jewelry collection with pieces from the 1920s – 1960s https://hobbylark.com/collecting/antique-jewelry3 that remain rare finds. She bought some jewelry in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, yet she really valued her collectables. She offered a story behind just about every piece of jewelry. It is why I am ableContinue reading “#3 Gems from Ancestry Gems”

Liggins Legacy-building in ‘this life’

Omaha, Nebraska’s Woods-Hughes-Liggins family is very special to the Owen-Wead family. My Dad, Dr. Rodney S. Wead, https://northomahahistory.com/2019/12/11/a-biography-of-rodney-wead/considers Media Maven Cathy Hughes https://www.omahamagazine.com/2018/11/21/301576/cathy-hughes his “little sis.” Dad and Cathy met as youthful residents in the Logan Fontenelle Housing Development “The ‘jects” https://northomahahistory.com/2015/08/20/a-history-of-the-logan-fontenelle-housing-projects/. Cathy’s Dad, William Alfred Woods, attended Creighton University and became the first AfricanContinue reading “Liggins Legacy-building in ‘this life’”

Breaking through the Ice: First Black Ice Figure Skater could not compete during tragic Jim Crow era

Honored now posthumously by Ice Skating organizations, young black women Mabel Fairbanks Mabel Fairbanks was born in Jacksonville, Florida in the early 1920s. Life there was subjugated by abject poverty, bigotry, and Jim Crow laws. In the early 1930s, there was a great migration north in which Fairbanks’ brothers and sisters moved to New YorkContinue reading “Breaking through the Ice: First Black Ice Figure Skater could not compete during tragic Jim Crow era”