Freebie Friday: Historical mapping

I was moved by a newspaper columnist’s description of the great flood in the 1940s that invaded my hometown, Omaha, Nebraska and neighboring city, Council Bluffs, Iowa. What led me to this article was an active conversation I was having with my parents about a time when the entire community pulled together to help oneContinue reading “Freebie Friday: Historical mapping”

Aunt Ancestor Still Leading me on Genealogy Journey

On this annual day of Epiphany, it is also the birth of my most cheriished ancestor. Today, Jan. 6, 2022, would have been my Paternal Aunt Beverly Ann Wead Blackburn Jones’ 85th birthday. She transitioned in 1973 at the age of 36. I was 15 years old. It was the first family death that left anContinue reading “Aunt Ancestor Still Leading me on Genealogy Journey”

#46 Free (Black) Friday: Interview Your Relatives

By planes, trains and automobiles, an estimated 54 million U.S. travelers made it families and friends this 2021 Thanksgiving season. Those numbers are nearly equal to pre-Covid 2019 levels, according to AAA, air, train and government travel trackers. If so, don’t spend all of your time around the table of good food, or shopping untilContinue reading “#46 Free (Black) Friday: Interview Your Relatives”

#41 City Directories address ancestral gaps

There is no better resource than city directories to locate and confirm your ancestral loved ones. A year after my father was born, the 1936 city directory of Omaha, Nebraska provided great insight into the following: The names of my grandparents, Sampson and Daisy Wead. The occupation of my grandparents. My grandfather was a laborerContinue reading “#41 City Directories address ancestral gaps”

Repost #11 Genealogy TipSheet: Don’t forget the Potter’s fields

It is a tough lick when one cannot locate a relative whom we know existed, yet is not “findable.” In genealogy research, we refer to such situations as brick walls. One tool to help chip away at those walls are found in places that we may driven past a hundred times. In my home stateContinue reading “Repost #11 Genealogy TipSheet: Don’t forget the Potter’s fields”

#28 Linking fruit trees to family trees

Growing up in Omaha, Nebraska and Chicago, Illinois, I am used to frequent ribbing about the Midwestern “foreign land.” It was while I was attending Clark College (now CAU, a HBCU) in Atlanta, Georgia, that I first became the subject of great humor about my Midwestern upbringing. It helped that my maiden surname is “Wead”Continue reading “#28 Linking fruit trees to family trees”