#27 Cleaning up: The 1881 Atlanta Washerwomen’s demands

One hundred and 40 years ago under the hot Atlanta sun, a group of African American women formed an assocaition and staged a major labor organizing effort that was leadng toward a general strike. Such a strike would have shut down Atlanta’s business and political establishments, according to reports in the Atlanta Constitution newspaper andContinue reading “#27 Cleaning up: The 1881 Atlanta Washerwomen’s demands”

We Grow From Healthy Soil Planted by our Ancestors

SATURDAY, JULY 24, 2021” I GROW FROM HEALTHY SOIL “ Source: daily_thoughts_from_the_hill@hillsideinternational.org     ” Our ancestors planted us in rich, fertile soil. They fertilized our soil with their energy, thoughts, and deeds. They fought for us. They struggled for us. They set standards, values, and examples of how to calibrate the moral compass. They left a legacyContinue reading “We Grow From Healthy Soil Planted by our Ancestors”

#26 LYNCHINGS AND LIES: LEST US NOT FORGET THE RED SUMMER OF 1919

I grew up in a city where rage, lies, and fears led to the savage killing of a disabled African American man who was accused of accosting a “Karen.” It was 1919. I never knew the story growing up in my hometown of Omaha, Nebraska. A century before the death of George Floyd in 2020,Continue reading “#26 LYNCHINGS AND LIES: LEST US NOT FORGET THE RED SUMMER OF 1919”

#25 Black Pioneer Settlers Move from Kentucky Green to Plains’ Grass: How the first and only remaining black town west of the Mississippi was developed

A lot was going on in 1877 for African Americans in the U.S. South. It was enough to drive them West in search of the promised land. For blacks in the Georgetown, Kentucky area, their Sunday morning worship services were interrupted by real estate speculators. They offered an opportunity to move west to establish homesteadsContinue reading “#25 Black Pioneer Settlers Move from Kentucky Green to Plains’ Grass: How the first and only remaining black town west of the Mississippi was developed”

#24 Your ancestors in college

A recent weekend webinar about slave history in the physical building of the University of Georgia in Athens, supports the extended research that traces African Americans’ involvement on campuses across the nation. Even worse in Athens, UGA’s Baldwin Hall just completed its unearthing and findings of the bones of former slaves who were buried beneathContinue reading “#24 Your ancestors in college”

#23 Who do you think you are?

Ultimately, who are we? Based on our twisted and tangled family histories, African Americans and Afro Caribbeans are the ones whose ancestors were sold and traded to satisfy enslavers’ mortgages and other sales. We want to get answers to this question about ‘who are we?’ as we remove bricks and tree forests to answer ourContinue reading “#23 Who do you think you are?”

“August First” … the original Day of Independence for British owned slaves

Some 30 years before the United States’ Emancipation Proclamation was signed, 800,000 slaves in the British colonies were declared freed. “August First” or Slavey Abolition Act, marks the day in 1834 when it became illegal to own slaves in British colonies — yet with a four-year transition to full freedom for our Afro Caribbean brethren.Continue reading ““August First” … the original Day of Independence for British owned slaves”